National Pollinator Week is June 19th through 25th

Show Your Love for Pollinators This Growing Season

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Monarch butterfly on purple flower

The many benefits of pollinators

Many often wonder why pollinators are important in their garden. Pollinators are important because they are vital in the reproduction of flowering plants and the fruits and vegetables. So if you want large blooms, seeds, fruits, and vegetables in your garden, make it a pollinator friendly garden!

"Pollinators help plants that bring us food and other resources. By carrying pollen from one plant to another, pollinators fertilize plants and allow them to make fruit or seeds. Pollinator health is critical to our food system and the diversity of life across the world." University of Minnesota Extension

For more information on Minnesota Native Bees check out the University of Minnesota Wild Bees and Building Wild Bee houses handbook. (Wild Bee Houses near the middle of the document)

For more information pertaining to pollinator education check out the Learning Center at Pollinator Partnership.

Bee on a yellow Dahlia

Bee on a Dahlia

Planting Recomendations

To attract more pollinators to your garden be sure to ask your designer to include these flowing plants into your plan or look for these plants at your local garden center. These are not the only flowering plants that attract pollinators.

  • For Butterflies:
    • Perennials: Yarrow, Coneflower, Phlox
    • Annuals: Zinnia, Aster, Dill
  • For Bees:
    • Perennials: Daisy, Aster, Salvia
    • Annuals: Dahlia , Sunflower, Lavender
  • For Humming Birds:
    • Perennials: Lilly, Lilac, Azalea
    • Annuals: Snapdragon, Monkey Flower, Fuchsia

For planting guides check out the Planting Guides at the Pollinator Partnership.

monarch on a pink flower

Pollinator Friendly Practices

In order to give the pollinators the best treatment possible in your garden use these pollinator friendly practices:

  • Avoid using insecticides and pesticides
  • Plant a pollinator garden
  • Use native planting material
  • Provide shelter for the pollinators
    • Windbreaks
    • Nesting Areas- could include nectar/pollen trees as well as nest boxes
  • Control Invasive/Exotic plant species in your yard
    • Invasive Species Resource (Aquatic and Terrestrial) MN DNR Guide
  • Minimize your environmental impact

Bumble Bee Ballet, UMN Extension

How pollinator-friendly is your yard and garden right now?

It only takes 5 minutes to complete this survey to find out how your backyard measures up on plants, habitat and gardening practices that help bees and other beneficial insects.

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